Amy Klobuchar says she was treated for breast cancer.

“At this point my doctors believe that my chances of developing cancer again are no greater than the average person,” the senator wrote in a post on Medium.,

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

Amy Klobuchar says she was treated for breast cancer.

Senator Amy Klobuchar on Capitol Hill in July. After a routine screening in February, she learned she had breast Stage 1A cancer.
Senator Amy Klobuchar on Capitol Hill in July. After a routine screening in February, she learned she had breast Stage 1A cancer. Credit…Sarahbeth Maney/The New York Times
  • Sept. 9, 2021, 9:22 a.m. ET

Senator Amy Klobuchar said Thursday that she had been diagnosed and treated this year for breast cancer, and that her doctors said in August that her treatment had been successful.

“At this point my doctors believe that my chances of developing cancer again are no greater than the average person,” Ms. Klobuchar, Democrat of Minnesota, wrote in a post on Medium.

Ms. Klobuchar, 61, said she learned in February that she had Stage 1A cancer after doctors at Mayo Clinic found “small white spots called calcifications during a routine mammogram.”

She said that she underwent various tests and she subsequently had a lumpectomy on the right breast to remove the cancer. In May, she said she completed radiation treatment.

She said that doctors determined in August that the treatment had been successful.

“Of course this has been scary at times,” Ms. Klobuchar said. Adding, “Cancer is the word all of us fear.”

The senator said she was lucky it was caught early and that she had delayed having a mammogram.

The American Cancer Society recommends annual breast cancer screenings for women who are 45 to 54 years old. Women who are 55 and older should be screened every two years, according to the society.

“It’s easy to put off health screenings, just like I did,” she wrote. “But I hope my experience is a reminder for everyone of the value of routine health checkups, exams, and follow-through.”

Ms. Klobuchar, the chairwoman of the Rules and Administration Committee, said she underwent treatment while the committee investigated the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol and convened hearings on the new voting restrictions imposed by Republican-controlled state legislatures in Georgia and other parts of the country.

On Thursday, Ms. Klobuchar said on ABC’s Good Morning America that she had radiation two days after her father, Jim Klobuchar, died.

Ms. Klobuchar, who said her husband took her to her radiation treatments, said that her Senate colleagues did not know she had cancer.

“It’s something that no one wants to hear and no one wants to experience,” she said of the illness. “In the end, I just have this unbounding gratitude for the people that were there for me.”

Leave a Reply